a close up photo of a Black woman writing in a notebook on her sofa
Everyday Lifestyle

Writing Prompts To Help Boost Your Mood

Sometimes we need a little boost to lift our mood so that we can keep growing, move forward or nourish our souls. Writing or journaling can be part of an effective self-care routine because it can give us time for reflection and goal setting.

Here are a few suggestions to get you thinking about some of the good you have going on in your life and the worthwhile things you do for yourself and other people …

graphic link to an everyday lifestyle post on transatlantic notes called writing prompts to help boost your mood

Things That Went Well | Write about 3 things that you did today that went well. What positive impact did they have on you or those around you? They don’t need to be big, impressive things but rather any part of your everyday life that reminds you of the steps you take each day that matter.

A Better Tomorrow | Write a short plan about what you can do tomorrow to make your day better or to improve on something that maybe didn’t quite go as well as you had originally hoped. How can this be an opportunity to move forward? What did you learn from things not working out at this point? Remind yourself that each day is a fresh start and that you can make a difference.

It’s Going Well | Write a list of what’s working and going well for you in life at the moment — no matter how small. Use this to clearly see the progress you’ve made and focus on what this makes you feel and why it impacts you in a positive way. You’ve overcome or accomplished more than maybe you realize — you’ve got this!

photo of a woman sitting at a table writing a journal
photo via cottonbro

Times Are Different | Write about one area of your life — or one particular everyday aspect — that has improved from a year ago. Focus on how you are making progress and where this may lead you. Set a goal for where you want to be in another year and how you are going to work towards achieving it.

A Thank You | Spreading some kindness can definitely improve a gloomy mood as it helps us realize how much good we have around us. Write a thank-you note to a family member, friend or neighbour to let them know how much you appreciate them, email a store manager to leave a compliment for a worker who gave excellent service, thank a hospital worker for their care, leave a glowing review for a creator you bought something from, etc. No matter who you do this for, the difference you make in their day will be something you feel positive about too.

Pay-It-Forward | Write a plan for some simple ways you can pay-it-forward. Cover the bill for the person behind you in line at the drive-thru, pay for the next person’s coffee at your favourite caffeinated spot — anything you can think of — as it could well be the reason that someone has a better day. Simple acts of thoughtfulness and care are never wasted.

photo by brad neathery of a young Black man sitting on a wall writing in a notebook
photo via Brad Neathery

Words To Live By | Write down your favourite quote and list the ways you use it in your daily life or why you like it so much. Has it inspired you to do anything or does it remind you of someone/something important? Create a graphic of it so that you can share it with others and explain what it means to you.

Music You Love | Make a list of 5 songs or pieces of music that make you feel really good. Which one energizes you or makes you feel ready for the day? Which one has the best memories attached to it? Make a simple timetable of when these tracks would be most beneficial to play (such as when you are getting ready for work, exercising or doing chores, etc) and enjoy the encouragement it gives you!

But please remember, feeling positive is not always going to happen or come easily, it’s okay to not see the sunny side of life when things are being particularly difficult, tough or painful. While this collection of writing prompts may be a useful self-care tool, if you’re overwhelmed or struggling with stress, anxiety or depression they will not provide the support you need. Here are some places you can get help …

NAMI Helpline – a free, nationwide U.S. resource that offers experienced peer-support guidance and advice

CheckPoint – global (by country) resources for mental health support

Further Info:

Why You Should Pay It Forward — HuffPost

5 Reasons Why Being Kind Makes You Feel Good — The Conversation

5 Powerful Health Benefits of Journaling — Intermountain Healthcare

If you enjoy reading Transatlantic Notes and would like to show your support for the work being done, please consider making a small donation. Thank you.

30 thoughts on “Writing Prompts To Help Boost Your Mood”

  1. Love this post! All these positive words (Yes…I got this!) made me feel better already. It’s a great idea to write about the things that went well. I have a long list of things to do, and sometimes I get frustrated when I’m unable to do all my tasks. It’s nice to write your accomplishments to recognize the progress you’re making at the end of the day.

    Like

    1. I sometimes find I get into a rut of just thinking about the things that didn’t work out or that I feel I didn’t do well so it’s a nice reminder to myself (and anyone who uses these prompts) to refocus on the things that are good and working and worthwhile. I find it helps motivate me to get passed anything that might be holding me back. Thank you so much for reading and taking the time to comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I love these ideas when days feel like weeks and months feel like weeks its important to mark our achievements some how and I think writing them down could be a great way to show ourselves our own growth and progression over time and how each little step has helped us progress.

    Like

  3. I like this! For the past several years I’ve been keeping a gratitude journal, in which I document everything that went poorly and everything that went well. I write about the bad as well just to get it off my chest and onto paper. This seems to make me feel better. And of course, taking a few minutes at night to run down the list of everything that went well for me boosts my mood incredibly 🙂 I’m going to try and take some of your advice and incorporate it into my gratitude journal. Good article!

    Like

  4. I love this. I did my first journal piece last night because I really am trying to break out of a slump and some negative thinking at the moment, but didn’t feel like I knew what I was doing. There’s some great ideas here, and I love that no matter how small, it’s worth it. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

    1. I find that my journaling can sometimes be a bit sporadic as I get a little unsure too but when I do it, I find that it also helps me out of a negative slump because I remember to include all my small successes, etc. It’s definitely worth it! Thank you so much for reading!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s